Amber's Organics Newsletter.
News, updates, new products and garden talk all this month!

 

"When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bonds; your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction, and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be".

 

NEW! TEXT AMBER IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS! This is a new service to help you because it is not always easy to answer the phone and do the multitude of tasks that I must do, so please feel free to text and receive a much faster response to your questions.  (559) 326 3019 

 

ALERT! Amber’s Organics has a special request to all of my lovely customers.

I am introducing my “ Organic Hall Of Fame” photo album. We need pictures of YOU with your favourite product ( ..or seeds, growing, garden, etc) with a comment about why you love it, make them fun and show your creative flare & just be your natural self. you will be added to the new Face Book & Website albumsPlease send all pictures to my email address ambersoffea@aol.com   

 

News This Month! 5 months in TX and so much has happened, I have found three new and extremely brilliant Doctors who are at least brining together a new protocol for long sought after health ailments (see Bio)  Slow but sure it may be but I can say that God guided and God provided and continually leads the way. 

I shall be revamping the website in the future weeks, with better checkout for your convenience, more options for payment and better shipping rates to offer,  more assessable features, updated pictures so that you can see your favourite products with ease, this is being worked on as I write  and I cannot wait to get your comments in the final results.

We are also going to seen at local craft fairs and markets, updates and news will follow.

 

WANTED, CAT FOOD FOR OUR GANG OF GLORIOUS RESCUED CATS.

AMBER'S ORGANICS HAS BEEN SELLING NEW AND RECYCLED CLOTHES VIA EBAY TO FEED THE HUNGRY FELINES BUT WE CAN ALWAYS USE MORE. IF YOU WISH TO SEND A DONATION OF CAT FOOD, CLOTHES TO SELL OR A DONATION OF ANY KIND PLEASE POST TO AMBER'S ORGANICS, C/O CAT FEED FUND 3781 SHERRIL BROOK RD, SAN ANTONIO TX 78228.

WE BLESS YOU!

SAD NEW!  March 11th.  It is a sad day here at Amber's Organics. Last night our Precious Samuel Six Toes a brutally killed. He will be so dearly missed. This little boy was a delightful charm, comfort, companion, a huggable friend in trying times and so much more. As with all loss there is a sense that we wish we had the power to have prevented this, but his life with us was the happiest it could be that consoles the heart somewhat. Samuel stole the hearts of all he met with his beautiful angelic face, bright blue eyes, fluffy fat feet, loving nature and contagious purrs. He was our head Charge cat and Laugh a minute mascot. There is a big gap today as his void is felt everywhere, we shall just pray that the Lord will send more needy animals to a place where they are truly loved. Bless you my little Sam!

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Recent News! We made it to Texas, the state where everything is big and we aim to get much bigger! After a three day enduring and grueling (but utterly incredible trip) we finally made it to our new home and business establishment. This is better than I imagined and after another episode of hard work and alterations I am sure it will be a new new herb shop to be proud of.  I will be having to start my organic garden from scratch as I was unable to bring any plants  with me but a challenge was something I was never shy of and offers me an opportunity to try some new projects.  There are many dreams to unfold as each day progresses so watch this space and keep on with your wonderful support we are moving on by the Grace of God.

Please read my wonderful feedback to see how much Amber's Organics is appreciated. It makes me blessed to serve. 

 

Your own suggestions are always appreciated so do not hesitate to write to me at my email address. ambersorganics@aol.com

 

NEW! TEXT AMBER IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS!

 

Featured products. Prepare yourself for Spring!

 

Organic Herbal Clear Shampoo & Body Wash. Delicious Scents NO SSL.

This has become a very popular shampoo here at Amber's Organics but now it has advanced by also becoming a body wash, it seemed wrong to waste a drop of it. This improved version will be even more loved of that I have no doubt and a little goes a very long way so this is ultimately costs effective. The blend will hydrate the skin and is not drying, so your hair looks good and your skin looks great too, the perfect combination.

This gorgeous product has great reviews and continues to impress us all, it's also Sulfates free, that makes a world of difference to you and to our environment. It will leave your hair light and bouncy. So do not settle for less if you love your hair try this and tell me what you think.

$9.50

Recipe of the month.

Homemade Natural Hair Detangler Recipe

Homemade natural hair detangler is a snap to make!  You may have all the ingredients already since they are versatile. Just add to a spray bottle the following and give a good shake before each use:
 
  • 8 oz of distilled water
  • 1 tsp aloe vera gel (I punctured and squeezed six of my capsules into a measuring spoon.)
  • 2 drops of glycerine
  • 2 drops of essential oil (Lavender or rosemary are excellent choices for healthy hair.)
  • 15 drops of grapefruit seed extract


 

 
"But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her…"
~ 1 Corinthians 11:15a

 

 
For Migraine
1 ounce valerian leaves + ½ ounce of juniper berries + 1⅔ ounce of St. John's wort + 1 ounce of linden flowers

Procedure

Always use clean water to make the herbal tea, and prepare the tea in clean cookware of cast iron, glass or stainless steel (other than aluminum).
In the boiling water, add the given amount of the desired herbs. Cover the container and let the herbs steep for 10 to 15 minutes.
Never over-steep the herbs as it might have an adverse effect on the flavor as well as use of the herbs.
You can also add lemon and honey to enhance the flavor and aroma of your tea.
Strain the tea with the help of a regular tea strainer.
Read more at Buzzle: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/herbal-tea-recipes.html
Procedure

Always use clean water to make the herbal tea, and prepare the tea in clean cookware of cast iron, glass or stainless steel (other than aluminum).
In the boiling water, add the given amount of the desired herbs. Cover the container and let the herbs steep for 10 to 15 minutes.
Never over-steep the herbs as it might have an adverse effect on the flavor as well as use of the herbs.
You can also add lemon and honey to enhance the flavor and aroma of your tea.
Strain the tea with the help of a regular tea strainer.
Read more at Buzzle: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/herbal-tea-recipes.html
For Migraine
1 ounce valerian leaves + ½ ounce of juniper berries + 1⅔ ounce of St. John's wort + 1 ounce of linden flowers

Procedure

Always use clean water to make the herbal tea, and prepare the tea in clean cookware of cast iron, glass or stainless steel (other than aluminum).
In the boiling water, add the given amount of the desired herbs. Cover the container and let the herbs steep for 10 to 15 minutes.
Never over-steep the herbs as it might have an adverse effect on the flavor as well as use of the herbs.
You can also add lemon and honey to enhance the flavor and aroma of your tea.
Strain the tea with the help of a regular tea strainer.
Read more at Buzzle: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/herbal-tea-recipes.html

 

For Migraine
1 ounce valerian leaves + ½ ounce of juniper berries + 1⅔ ounce of St. John's wort + 1 ounce of linden flowers

Procedure

Always use clean water to make the herbal tea, and prepare the tea in clean cookware of cast iron, glass or stainless steel (other than aluminum).
In the boiling water, add the given amount of the desired herbs. Cover the container and let the herbs steep for 10 to 15 minutes.
Never over-steep the herbs as it might have an adverse effect on the flavor as well as use of the herbs.
You can also add lemon and honey to enhance the flavor and aroma of your tea.
Strain the tea with the help of a regular tea strainer.
Read more at Buzzle:
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/herbal-tea-recipes.html

Coriander & Egg White Face Lift

  • Toss a handful of fresh, rinsed coriander leaves, 2 egg whites and 1/2 cup uncooked oats into a food processor.
  • Blend till everything is well mixed and reaches a thick, paste-like consistency.
  • Apply this paste to freshly cleansed face; let is sit for 10-15 minutes or until it hardens, then rinse off.

 
 

And now onto something for your garden's delight!

 

 

2 Easy Compost Recipes to Get Your Organic Garden Growing

A healthy vibrant garden requires organic nutrients like carbon and nitrogen. Compost is a natural recycling technique used by organic gardeners to put nutrients back into depleted soil. It can be made at home by reusing leftover scraps from the kitchen and organic matter from the yard. Check out our article on the benefits of compost for your garden.

Making compost is like baking a cake or making soup. When you make it the first time or two, you use a recipe. The recipe contains a list of ingredients and an explanation of how to combine them. If an ingredient is missing or isn't added according to the recipe the cake or soup might fail.

This also applies to compost, there is a recipe. There are specific ingredients that require specific measurements. Furthermore, like your cake recipe the ingredients must be combined in a certain way for the recipe to succeed.

Below is a recipe for two different types of compost piles. One is high maintenance and will produce compost quickly in four to six weeks. The other is a low maintenance recipe and who knows when you will have compost. It could be one month, two months or even a year before you have usable compost.

Spring and fall are great times to start composting as there are plenty of ingredients available from your own garden and kitchen waste. So clean up the yard, follow the recipe below and start composting!

Ingredients:

Note: You will need nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) at a ratio of one part (N)itrogen to three parts (C)arbon.

(N)itrogen (one part) components consist of:

  • Stable scraps like horse manure, rabbit, pig, goat and chicken manure
  • Fish meal
  • Blood meal
  • Cottonseed meal
  • Legumes such as alfalfa and pea clover
  • Green garden waste like weeds
  • Algae and sea weed
  • Coffee grounds and filters
  • Algae
  • Seaweed
  • Lake moss
  • Hair
  • Kitchen vegetable scraps
  • Grass clippings without chemical fertilizers from the first two or three weeks of spring when they are lush and tender (at this time they are high in nitrogen but afterward they go into the carbon category)
  • Sod

(C)arbon (three parts) components consists of:

  • Straw
  • Dried leaves
  • Sawdust in small amounts, (as long as it hasn't been treated with chemicals)
  • Untreated wood chips in small amounts
  • Shredded newspaper
  • Cardboard
  • Dryer lint
  • Corn stalks and corn cob
  • Shredded brown paper grocery bags
  • Pine needles and pine cones
  • Oak leaves
  • Egg shells

Water - You will need just enough water for the pile to be moist, not wet.

Air Circulation

What NOT to add to a compost pile:

Ashes from coal or charcoal, cat litter or droppings, dog waste, fish scraps, ashes from untreated wood, meat, fat, grease, oils, bones, milk, cheese, yogurt, potatoes, sawdust and wood shavings from chemically treated wood.

Recipe for a high maintenance compost pile:

If you want compost quickly and you aren't afraid of a few quick chores then this recipe is for you.

Compost can be made in a pile in the back yard or a binicon according to the compost chef's preferences. Keep in mind that if you mix your compost in a pile, it needs to be protected from varmints. You can easily do this by surrounding the pile with chicken wire or by building a wood enclosure. Make sure that any large ingredients, like paper bags or garden waste, are broken down into small pieces so that they will quickly decompose.

For maximum production of your compost pile, combine all of your ingredients at once. Don't keep adding ingredients to the bin. Every time a new ingredient is added to the pile, the decomposition process starts over. That's why it is a good idea to have two piles going at the same time. Use one pile to collect the ingredients and a second pile that is engaged in the composting process.

To build your compost pile, first put a pile of twigs and sticks at the bottom so your pile will circulate air and breathe. Next, layer the (C)arbon and (N)itrogen ingredients on top of the twigs, starting with the (C)arbon ingredients. Continue with the (N)itrogen and then the (C)arbon, next the (N)itrogen and finishing with the (C)arbon.

Next add water. Add just enough so that the ingredients feel like a damp sponge that has been wrung out. To test for dampness pick up a handful of the ingredients and wring them out. If a few drops of water come out, it's perfect. However if a stream of water comes out, your pile is too wet. If the pile is too wet, add more dry ingredients and let the pile dry out. To help the pile quickly dry while keeping it oxygenated, turn it often using a shovel or a pitch fork, about once every day or two.

If you mixed one part (N)itrogen with three parts (C)arbon and your compost pile is damp like a wrung out sponge, it should heat to a temperature between 104°-160°, even in cold northern climates. Stir the pile about every four to seven days. Mix thoroughly. Stirring will move the cold ingredients into the warm center of the pile. Stirring replenishes foods and oxygen for the microorganisms that are hard at work breaking down the ingredients. Heat helps the ingredients quickly decompose and keeps the pile operating at its peak. Moreover, at 131° most disease causing pathogens die as well as pests, seeds and weeds.

You will know when your compost is finished when it smells earthy, contains small uniform particles and the color resembles dark brown soil and is light and fluffy.

Recipe for low maintenance compost:

If you don't care how long it takes to make compost, one month, six months, or even one year and you don't have time for weekly chores, then this recipe is for you.

Follow the above recipe. The exception, the ingredients of this low maintenance pile do not need to be combined at the same time. You can start your pile with a few ingredients and add ingredients as they become available. Furthermore, you don't need to stir this pile as often, just when you think of it. In this low maintenance recipe, do not add weeds or diseased plants because the compost won't get hot enough to destroy pathogens.

List of handy tools:

  • Garden gloves
  • Compost Bin or chicken wire
  • Compost Thermometer
  • Shovel
  • Pitch fork for stirring compost
  • Worms
  • Compost starter
  • Compost accelerator
  • • Indoor pail for kitchen waste
  • Books on composting
 

The following is a chart listing common composting materials

Type of Material Use it? Carbon/ Nitrogen Details
Vegetables and veggie peels Yes Nitrogen Great source of nitrogen. Bury in compost pile.
Leaves (trees and bushes) Yes Carbon May contain materials bad for plants.
Ashes from untreated, unpainted wood Careful Neutral Fine amounts at most. Can make the pile too alkaline and suppress
composting.
Fruit and fruit peels Yes Nitrogen great source of nitrogen. Bury within compost pile.
Bird droppings Careful Nitrogen May contain weed seeds or disease organisms.
Cardboard Yes Carbon Shred into small pieces if you use it. Wetting it makes it easier
to tear. If you have a lot, consider recycling instead.
Cat droppings or cat litter No n/a May contain disease organisms. Avoid.
Coffee ground and filters Yes N Great souce of nitrogen for your composter, add the grounds and the filter. Worms love coffee grounds and coffee filters.
Compost activator Not required, but ok. Neutral You don’t really need it, but it doesn’t hurt.
Cornstalks, corn cobs Yes Carbon Best if shredded and mixed well with nitrogen rich materials.
Diseased plants Careful Nitrogen If your pile doesn’t get hot enough, it might not kill the organisms,
so be careful. Let it cure several months, and don’t use resulting
compost near the type of plant that was diseased.
Dog droppings No n/a Avoid.
Dryer lint Yes Carbon Compost away! Moistening helps.
Eggshells Yes O Break down slowly. Crushing shells helps.
Fish scraps No n/a Can attract rodents and cause a stinky pile.
Beverages, kitchen rinse water Yes Neutral Good to moisten the middle of the pile. Don’t over-moisten the
pile.
Hair Yes Nitrogen Scatter so it isn’t in clumps.
Lime No n/a Can kill composting action. Avoid.
Manure (horse, cow, pig, sheep, goat, chicken, rabbit) Yes Nitrogen Great source of nitrogen. Mix with carbon rich materials so it
breaks down better.
Meat, fat, grease, oils, bones No n/a Avoid.
Milk, cheese, yogurt Careful Neutral Not recommended. Put it deep in the pile to avoid attracting animals.
Newspaper Yes Carbon Shred it so it breaks down easier. It is easy to add
too much newspaper, so recycle instead if you have a lot.
Don’t add slick colored pages.
Ashes from coal or charcoal No n/a Shredding leaves helps them break down faster.They decompose slower without shreding. Acidic.
Sawdust and wood shavings (untreated wood) Yes Carbon You’ll need a lot of nitrogen materials to make up for the high
carbon content. Don’t use too much, and don’t use treated woods.
Pine needles and cones Yes Carbon Don’t overload the pile. Also acidic and decomposes slowly.
Weeds Careful Nitrogen Dry them out on the pavement, then add later.
Sod Careful Nitrogen Make sure the pile is hot enough, so grass doesn’t continue
growing.
Algae, seaweed and lake moss Yes Nitrogen Good nutrient source.
 

Amber's Corner. Garden Tip of the month.  

 

Our earth is in trouble, and we've got to save it!

If you throw away 2 aluminum cans, you waste more energy than 1,000,000,000 (one billion) of the world's poorest people use a day.
Making a new can from scratch uses the energy equal to half a can of gasoline.
About one third of what an average American throws out is packaging.
More than 1,000,000,000 (one billion) trees are used to make disposable diapers every year.
In one minute, 50 acres of rainforest are destroyed.
Some rain has a pH of 3 or 4. (which is pretty acidic, considering 7 is neutral, not acidic, and battery acid has a pH of 1). Some fish, such as lake trout and smallmouth bass, have trouble reproducing at a pH of 6, which is only slightly acidic. Some clams and snails can't survive at all. Most crayfish are dead at a pH of 5. You can see how bad this is for the environment.
On average, a person in the US uses energy two times more than a person in Japan or West Germany does, and 50 times more than a person in India.
About 90% of the energy used in lighting a standard (incandescent) light bulb is lost as heat.
Air conditioning uses 10 times more energy than a fan, therefore, it creates 10 times the pollutants.
It takes half the output of the Alaskan pipeline to heat the air that escapes from all the homes in the US during a year.
Cars and pick-up trucks are responsible for about 20% of the carbon dioxide released into the air.
There are about 500 million automobiles on the planet, burning an average of 2 gallons of fuel a day. Each gallon releases 20 pounds of carbon dioxide into the air.
About 80% of our trash goes to landfills, 10% is incinerated, and 10% is recycled.
Since there is little oxygen underground, where we bury our garbage, to help bacteria eat the garbage, almost nothing happens to it. Scientists have dug into landfills and found ears of corn still intact after 20 years, and newspapers still readable after 30.
The average American makes about 3.5 pounds of trash a day.
In a year, the average American uses as much wood in the form of paper as the average resident of the developing world burns as fuel.


26 things we can do to help:


1. Turn off lights.
2. Turn off other electric things, like TVs, stereos, and radios when not in use.
3. Use rechargable batteries.
4. Do things manually instead of electrically, like open cans by hand.
5. Use fans instead of air conditioners.
6. In winter, wear a sweater instead of turning up your thermostat.
7. Insulate your home so you won't be cold in winter.
8. Use less hot water.
9. Whenever possible, use a bus or subway, or ride your bike or walk.
10. Try to buy organic fruits and vegetables if you're concerned about pesticides. (Organic food is grown without man-made fertilizers and/or pesticides).
11. Don't waste products made from forest materials.
12. Use recycled paper and/or recycle it. Reuse old papers.
13. Don't buy products that may have been made at the expense of the rainforest.
14. Support products that are harvested from the rainforest but have not cut down trees to get it.
15. Plant trees, espessially if you have cut one down.
16. Get other people to help you in your cause. Make and/or join an organization.
17. Avoid products that are used once, then thrown away.
18. Buy products with little or no packaging.
19. Encourage your grocery store sell environmentally friendly cloth bags for people to use when they shop, or bring your own.
20. REDUCE, REUSE, & RECYCLE.
21. Compost.
22. Buy recycled products.
23. Don't buy pets taken from the wild.
24. If you have a good zoo nearby, (if the animals are healthy and the zoo takes care of them), support it! Especially if they help breed endangered animals.
25. Don't buy products if animals were killed to make it.
26. Cut up your six-pack rings before throwing them out.

What Winston Churchill Can Teach You about Green Living

 Winston Churchill 

Winston Churchill was a bigger-than-life statesman, military man and strong voice during the horror of World War II. He also wrote, receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature. He used words well. His wisdom is something to study for straight-forward talk.

“The price of greatness is responsibility.”
Churchill understood responsibility. There is a valuable lesson here that if the
United States is to be a leader in green living, we must act accordingly. Being green isn’t always easy, but it’s the right thing to do.

“We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.”
Giving back to the planet is an honorable thing to do. There is a certain sense of satisfaction that comes from knowing that you are making green choices and reducing your carbon footprint. It’s a personal thing. Some people may not
car to make that decision, but you have. You are helping to make a better life for future generations.

“We are stripped bare by the curse of plenty.”
One of the best ways to live a green lifestyle is to live within your means, using just what you need. America has become a society of plenty. It’s not enough to have just one TV or stereo. The average American has lots of things. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the average household has 24
electronic products. This adds up to significant portion of your home’s carbon footprint.

“Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.”
Some people write off actions like recycling or smart
purchases, saying that they mean nothing. However, when taken as a whole, your choices and those of others make a big difference. Americans are embracing recycling more and more. Recovery rates of most items in the municipal solid waste stream continue to rise. It’s the change in attitude that makes the difference.

Winston Churchill was a wise man in his time and still today. He has much to teach us about fortitude and courage even in the darkest times. His words can be an inspiration to you and others to make good choices that will benefit the environment and future generations. These selfless acts are the foundation of greatness.

Lazy Person's Compost

Ingredients: green and brown yard waste, water as needed.

Directions

  • In a heap, layer your yard waste as it accumulates. For faster composting, chip it up first.
  • Water so compost is kept as moist as a wrung-out sponge.
  • In a year to 18 months, the material at the bottom and center of the pile will be dark, crumbly compost. Sift, and use the uncomposted material to start a new batch.
 

 



 
Chamomile Jelly Recipe from Britain Origin: Britain Period: Traditional This is a traditional British recipe for a classic clear jelly made from apples that's flavoured with dried chamomile flowers. Ingredients: 2.5kg cooking apples, washed and roughly chopped juice of 3 lemons 6 tbsp dried chamomile flowers 75g sugar per 100ml liquid Celtnet recipes chicken recipe divider Chamomile Jelly Preparation: Method: Place the apples and the chamomile flowers in a heavy-bottomed saucepan along with just enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes, until very soft. Pour into a jelly bag or a sieve lined with several layers of muslin and allow to drain into a bowl (do not be tempted to squeeze the bag as this will only make the jelly cloudy). The following morning discard the fruit pulp and flowers then measure the volume of the liquid and add 75g sugar per 100ml of fluid. Place the juice, lemon juice and the sugar in a saucepan, heat through then add the sugar, stirring until completely dissolved. Bring to a boil and cook rapidly for about 15 minutes. Test for setting by placing a plate in the fridge. Spoon a little of the jelly onto the plate, allow to cook then move it with your fingernail. If a crinkly skin forms then the jelly is ready. If not continue boiling for 5 minutes more and test again. Skim the surface then ladle into sterilized jars that have been warmed in an oven set to 100°C for 5 minutes. Allow 1cm of head space then secure the lid, allow to cool and store. This is excellent jelly with a delicate apple and honey flavour that works well on toast and makes a good accompaniment to cheese.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-chamomile-jelly
Copyright © celtnet
Chamomile Jelly Recipe from Britain Origin: Britain Period: Traditional This is a traditional British recipe for a classic clear jelly made from apples that's flavoured with dried chamomile flowers. Ingredients: 2.5kg cooking apples, washed and roughly chopped juice of 3 lemons 6 tbsp dried chamomile flowers 75g sugar per 100ml liquid Celtnet recipes chicken recipe divider Chamomile Jelly Preparation: Method: Place the apples and the chamomile flowers in a heavy-bottomed saucepan along with just enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes, until very soft. Pour into a jelly bag or a sieve lined with several layers of muslin and allow to drain into a bowl (do not be tempted to squeeze the bag as this will only make the jelly cloudy). The following morning discard the fruit pulp and flowers then measure the volume of the liquid and add 75g sugar per 100ml of fluid. Place the juice, lemon juice and the sugar in a saucepan, heat through then add the sugar, stirring until completely dissolved. Bring to a boil and cook rapidly for about 15 minutes. Test for setting by placing a plate in the fridge. Spoon a little of the jelly onto the plate, allow to cook then move it with your fingernail. If a crinkly skin forms then the jelly is ready. If not continue boiling for 5 minutes more and test again. Skim the surface then ladle into sterilized jars that have been warmed in an oven set to 100°C for 5 minutes. Allow 1cm of head space then secure the lid, allow to cool and store. This is excellent jelly with a delicate apple and honey flavour that works well on toast and makes a good accompaniment to cheese.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-chamomile-jelly
Copyright © celtnet
Chamomile Jelly Recipe from Britain Origin: Britain Period: Traditional This is a traditional British recipe for a classic clear jelly made from apples that's flavoured with dried chamomile flowers. Ingredients: 2.5kg cooking apples, washed and roughly chopped juice of 3 lemons 6 tbsp dried chamomile flowers 75g sugar per 100ml liquid Celtnet recipes chicken recipe divider Chamomile Jelly Preparation: Method: Place the apples and the chamomile flowers in a heavy-bottomed saucepan along with just enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes, until very soft. Pour into a jelly bag or a sieve lined with several layers of muslin and allow to drain into a bowl (do not be tempted to squeeze the bag as this will only make the jelly cloudy). The following morning discard the fruit pulp and flowers then measure the volume of the liquid and add 75g sugar per 100ml of fluid. Place the juice, lemon juice and the sugar in a saucepan, heat through then add the sugar, stirring until completely dissolved. Bring to a boil and cook rapidly for about 15 minutes. Test for setting by placing a plate in the fridge. Spoon a little of the jelly onto the plate, allow to cook then move it with your fingernail. If a crinkly skin forms then the jelly is ready. If not continue boiling for 5 minutes more and test again. Skim the surface then ladle into sterilized jars that have been warmed in an oven set to 100°C for 5 minutes. Allow 1cm of head space then secure the lid, allow to cool and store. This is excellent jelly with a delicate apple and honey flavour that works well on toast and makes a good accompaniment to cheese.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-chamomile-jelly
Copyright © celtnet
Chamomile Jelly Recipe from Britain Origin: Britain Period: Traditional This is a traditional British recipe for a classic clear jelly made from apples that's flavoured with dried chamomile flowers. Ingredients: 2.5kg cooking apples, washed and roughly chopped juice of 3 lemons 6 tbsp dried chamomile flowers 75g sugar per 100ml liquid Celtnet recipes chicken recipe divider Chamomile Jelly Preparation: Method: Place the apples and the chamomile flowers in a heavy-bottomed saucepan along with just enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes, until very soft. Pour into a jelly bag or a sieve lined with several layers of muslin and allow to drain into a bowl (do not be tempted to squeeze the bag as this will only make the jelly cloudy). The following morning discard the fruit pulp and flowers then measure the volume of the liquid and add 75g sugar per 100ml of fluid. Place the juice, lemon juice and the sugar in a saucepan, heat through then add the sugar, stirring until completely dissolved. Bring to a boil and cook rapidly for about 15 minutes. Test for setting by placing a plate in the fridge. Spoon a little of the jelly onto the plate, allow to cook then move it with your fingernail. If a crinkly skin forms then the jelly is ready. If not continue boiling for 5 minutes more and test again. Skim the surface then ladle into sterilized jars that have been warmed in an oven set to 100°C for 5 minutes. Allow 1cm of head space then secure the lid, allow to cool and store. This is excellent jelly with a delicate apple and honey flavour that works well on toast and makes a good accompaniment to cheese.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-chamomile-jelly
Copyright © celtnet
 
 
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What does it exactly mean to live organically? Well, aside from eating organic foods, organic living applies to many things. This day and age, our home living environments are constantly inundated with products, many of which we have grown so accustomed to, that we really don't always stop to think if they could be affecting our health - especially in the long term. Many people who have made the switch to organic and natural living, oftentimes were prompted to do so because of unexplainable health conditions (such as allergies) that seemingly popped up overnight. It goes to show how much we truly don't know about the repercussions and effects of manmade chemicals and artificial substances present in our daily lives. If you stop to think about it, it makes perfect sense to live as Mother Nature intended us to. Even if you can't do everything organically, you can at least try doing things more naturally. Please take your time to read up on our organic living tips and articles presented below. If you're like us, you will be surprised how much there is to learn about organic living.