Featured Herb of the week.
Milk Thistle.


"It better benefit a man to know one herb in the meadow, but to know it thoroughly, than to see the  whole meadow without knowing what grows on it"  Paracelses.


Milk thistle is know for it's healing and thereaputic effects on the liver the master herb for toxic livers. Used for achohol, free radical , environmental damage.

Milk thistle ( Silybum marianum ) has been used since Greco-Roman times as an herbal remedy for a variety of ailments, particularly liver problems. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries physicians in the United States used milk thistle seeds to relieve congestion of the liver, spleen, and kidneys. Today, several scientific studies suggest that active substances in milk thistle (particularly silymarin) protect the liver from damage caused by viruses, toxins, alcohol, and certain drugs such as acetaminophen (a common over the counter medication used for headaches and pain; acetaminophen, also called paracetamol, can cause liver damage if taken in large quantities or by people who drink alcohol regularly.)

Many professional herbalists recommend milk thistle extract for the prevention and/or treatment of various liver disorders including viral hepatitis, fatty liver associated with long term alcohol use, and liver damage from drugs and industrial toxins such as carbon tetrachloride.

Milk thistle is native to the Mediterranean, but is now widespread throughout the world. This stout thistle usually grows in dry, sunny areas. The stem branches at the top, and reaches a height of 4 to 10 feet. The leaves are wide, with white blotches or veins. The flowers are red-purple. The small, hard-skinned fruit is brown, spotted, and shiny. Milk thistle is easy to grow, and it matures quickly, in less than a year.


Disclaimer: Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease.




What's new?


NEW! Jojoba Seed.

Jojobaproduces an edible oil from its fruit. Jojoba is grown commercially for its oil, a liquid wax ester, extracted from the seed.Indigenous Native Americans in the Sonora and Baja California used jojoba seed and oil for cooking, hair care and for treatments of many medical problems such as poison ivy, sores, wounds, colds, cancer, and kidney malfunction. Seeds may also be boiled to make a well-flavored drink similar to coffee, hence the name Coffeberry.

From $3.50